accommodate


accommodate
[[t]əkɒ̱mədeɪt[/t]]
accommodates, accommodating, accommodated
1) VERB: no cont If a building or space can accommodate someone or something, it has enough room for them.

[V n] The school in Poldown was not big enough to accommodate all the children...

[V n] The CD-ROMS will accommodate the works of all English poets from 600 to 1900.

2) VERB To accommodate someone means to provide them with a place to live or stay.

[V n] ...a hotel built to accommodate guests for the wedding of King Alfonso...

[be V-ed prep/adv] Students are accommodated in homes nearby.

3) VERB If something is planned or changed to accommodate a particular situation, it is planned or changed so that it takes this situation into account.

[V n] The roads are built to accommodate gradual temperature changes...

[V n] The way that American history is taught may change in order to accommodate some more of those cultures.

4) VERB If you do something to accommodate someone, you do it with the main purpose of pleasing or satisfying them.

[V n] He has never put an arm around his wife to accommodate photographers...

[V n] He's already altered several of the proposals in his economic plan to accommodate demands of special interests.

Syn:
5) VERB If you accommodate to something new, you change your behaviour or ideas so that you are able to deal with it. [FORMAL]

[V to n] Some animal and plant species cannot accommodate to the rapidly changing conditions...

[V pron-refl to n] She walked slowly to accommodate herself to his pace.

Syn:

English dictionary. 2008.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Accommodate — Ac*com mo*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accommodated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Accommodating}.] [L. accommodatus, p. p. of accommodare; ad + commodare to make fit, help; con + modus measure, proportion. See {Mode}.] 1. To render fit, suitable, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • accommodate — ac·com·mo·date /ə kä mə ˌdāt/ vt dat·ed, dat·ing 1: to make a change or provision for accommodate a disability see also reasonable accommodation 2: to accept without compensation responsibility for a debt of (another person) in the event of… …   Law dictionary

  • accommodate — UK US /əˈkɒmədeɪt/ verb [T] ► to have or provide the space that someone or something needs: »The centre can accommodate up to 220 students. »The airport simply doesn t have enough room to accommodate increased air traffic. ► to give someone what… …   Financial and business terms

  • accommodate — [v1] make room, lodging available board, contain, domicile, entertain, furnish, harbor, hold, house, put up*, quarter, receive, rent, shelter, supply, take in, welcome; concept 226 Ant. turn away, turn out accommodate [v2] make, become suitable… …   New thesaurus

  • accommodate — [ə käm′ə dāt΄] vt. accommodated, accommodating [< L accommodatus, pp. of accommodare < ad , to + commodare, to fit < commodus: see COMMODE] 1. to make fit; adjust; adapt [to accommodate oneself to changes] 2. to reconcile (differences) 3 …   English World dictionary

  • Accommodate — Ac*com mo*date, a. [L. accommodatus, p. p. of accommodare.] Suitable; fit; adapted; as, means accommodate to end. [Archaic] Tillotson. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • accommodate — accommodate, accommodation These are among the most commonly misspelt words in English: there are two cs and two ms. The verb accommodate is followed by to when it means ‘adapt’ and by with when (less usually) it means ‘to equip, supply, oblige’ …   Modern English usage

  • Accommodate — Ac*com mo*date, v. i. To adapt one s self; to be conformable or adapted. [R.] Boyle. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • accommodate — (v.) 1530s, from L. accomodatus suitable, pp. of accomodare make fit, adapt, fit one thing to another, from ad to (see AD (Cf. ad )) + commodare make fit, from commodus fit (see COMMODE (Cf. commode)). Related …   Etymology dictionary

  • accommodate — 1 adjust, *adapt, conform, reconcile Analogous words: *yield, submit, bow, defer: modify, *change, alter, vary: temper, *moderate, qualify Antonyms: constrain Contrasted words: *estrange, alienate …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • accommodate — ► VERB 1) provide lodging or sufficient space for. 2) adapt to or fit in with. ORIGIN Latin accommodare, from commodus fitting …   English terms dictionary